From ‘Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights’: Politics and Light Interplay in the Art of Miles Regis

Miles participated in our STATE OF THE ARTS 2011 PRODUCING CHANGE event with 3D visual artist Brian Quandt and showcased “The Music Peace” as a 360 fulldome experience in The Vortex Dome.  Congratulations Miles! From ‘Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights’: Politics and Light Interplay in the Art of Miles Regis From The Huffington Post   It’s easy to compare noteworthy contemporary artists to those who’ve gone before.  In the case of Miles Regis, a Trinidadian-born multi-media artist based in Los Angeles, that associative list is undeniably impressive: Basquiat, Gaugin, Pollock, Dali and Rivera, to name a few. But Regis did not learn his craft studying the masters of Art History. Regis began organically, in the influences of his childhood in the Caribbean — of Carnival and calypso — and from watching Caribbean artists like his uncle, Alexander King. Regis’s most current show at the Barnsdall Art Park “Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights” is at once culturally transcendent and energized by a rooted sense of personal and historical experience. Two pieces, “Zoo Capitalism” and “Follow Your Truth,” recall the aesthetic and political pageantry of Trinidad’s Carnival. “Subconsciously I feel like I’m almost doing costuming on canvas,” he says. “During Carnival there were always political statements being made with vibrant textures and colors.” Regis’s own canvasses are alive with thick black lines, figurative and free-form, and striking flashes of crimson, yellow and baby blue. His uncle Alexander King’s piece “Pan God,” taking its title from the abbreviated name of the steel drum invented by Trinidadians, has had profound influence on the artist. “Nobody’s work has moved me the way my uncle’s work has,” he explains. Another artist Regis admires is Leroy Clarke who painted a lot about Trinidadian folklore and mythology. “He was raw and true in his work.” Regis discusses the idea of “ancestral energies” guiding him through his own work. Kin and culture flow freely through pieces like “Kiss the Kids For Me,” “Yet So Happy” and “Occupy Truth” as do candid expressions of inner-child. It’s no surprise that the title of this exhibition “Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights” originated with his nine-year-old son Djimon, who was doing a book report on Martin Luther King, Jr. At the Barnsdall Gallery Theater exhibition Regis debuts...

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YouTube to Double Down on Its ‘Channel’ Experiment

July 30, 2012 Wall Street Journal For Google Inc.’s YouTube it was a $150 million experiment: Seed dozens of new video “channels” on its Web service and see what works. So far, Google likes what it sees from the eight-month effort. The company says it will put in another $200 million to market the channels as it attempts to upgrade its content from simple user-generated videos and to lure more viewers and advertising. The site has launched nearly 100 new channels so far this year, attracting talent such as actor Amy Poehler to create or star in original episodes in an effort to draw new audiences—and blue-chip advertisers. YouTube has secured commitments from advertisers to run more than $150 million of ads on the channels this year, according to a person with direct knowledge of the sales. YouTube officials declined to comment on the figures. YoutubeWayne Brady and Chester See in a video on the YOMYOMF channel. The channels themselves, meanwhile, are working to find their place, with a lot of trial and error along the way. “Just because you build it doesn’t mean they’ll come,” says former television executive Larry Aidem, talking about YouTube viewers. In February, Mr. Aidem launched a YouTube channel about emerging music artists. The channel, called MyISH, got off to a slow start, featuring many videos in which presenters simply talked about their favorite artists. “It was crickets,” said Mr. Aidem, previously chief executive of the Sundance cable-TV channel. After studying viewer feedback, MyISH realized “the audience wasn’t big on talking heads” and wasn’t interested in a wide variety of musical genres. So Mr. Aidem and his team retooled the channel, hiring well-known YouTube personality Michael Buckley to anchor funny videos about pop stars like Katy Perry that also featured music clips. They also narrowed the channel’s focus to pop music. Within weeks, MyISH shot up the rankings. It became the 120th-most-viewed YouTube channel in June with more than 700,000 unique visitors, up from a No. 803 ranking and 130,000 unique visitors in April, according to comScore Inc. Mr. Aidem’s experience, which mirrors that of several other first-time YouTube producers, shows how finding the right formula to make a new channel stand out on the world’s leading video site...

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Six Keys to Implementing a Video Marketing Strategy

Six Keys to Implementing a Video Marketing Strategy THE VIDEO OPPORTUNITY The use of video in business is exploding. For entertainment, commerce, education, and collaboration, video is empowering new experiences and business models. For consumers, there is a world of new choice in what they watch, when they watch it and how – every second, an hour of video is uploaded to YouTube, and quality programming is flocking to various other destinations on new TV, mobile and web destinations. For businesses, there is opportunity as well to better connect with audiences, employees and other stakeholders in ways never before feasible. Enterprises are rushing to maximize these opportunities: according to the Aberdeen Group, 74% of enterprises either have or are plan- ning video distribution strategies, and 60% have or are planning to use video for internal collaboration. EXECUTION: STRATEGY’S BEST FRIEND As marketers have rushed to develop solid business strategies around video, they face several challenges. The video landscape continues to change, and the number of video initiatives in any one organization has skyrocketed. This has created a maze of complexity around asset management, video formatting and storage, access controls and workflow approval processes. To capture the wealth of opportunity video presents, marketers must first master the realities of executing those strategies. SIX KEYS TO IMPLEMENTING A VIDEO MARKETING STRATEGY Early adopters, industry analysts and pundits cite various requirements for success with video. We’ve assembled six core concepts. Adhering to these principles enable each stakeholder in the video marketing lifecyle to do her part with minimal exposure to technological, strategic or organizational pitfalls. 1. CLOUD-BASED STORAGE As video initiatives grow more numerous, crossing both functional as well as geographic borders, video teams by definition become distributed teams. This creates a major technological hurdle for project managers and producers, who need the ability to transport files among individuals at any time during a given project. Video teams need access to a cloud-based storage solution built to han- dle video and all of its various file formats and components – a solution to store master files for download and later use, while also serving as a virtual backup and online system of record for project assets. 2. USABILITY As marketers, customer service teams, and other less-technical members...

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SIGHT: A Futuristic Perspective of Augmented Reality….

AUGMENTED REALITY is a new communication technology rising in the media landscape.  Here is an intriguing fictional take by filmmakers Eran May-ray and Daneile Lazo on where AR could go. How would you use this powerful technology? Sight – A Futuristic Film about Augmented Reality A short futuristic film by Eran May-raz and Daniel Lazo. This is their graduation project from Bezaleal Academy of Arts posted on...

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The Fifth Sacred Thing

“The Fifth Sacred Thing,” by author and visionary Starhawk, is an excellent example of using the power of story to portray and inspire hope and a better future for humanity.   Starhawk and her team are now working to create a motion picture from the novel.   The Fifth Sacred Thing cover art by Keith Batcheller They say that movies are collective dreams.  If so, we’re heading for a nightmare—for there are very few films that show a positive future on earth.  We want to change that.  How can we create a thriving, just and balanced future if we can’t even imagine it?  We want to bring alive a vision that can inspire people—and we’ve found the story in Starhawk’s novel, The Fifth Sacred Thing. In the story, set in 2048, Northern California has survived eco-catastrophes, wars and epidemics and forged a society based on respect for the Four Sacred Things that support life: air, fire, water and earth.  Streets are turned into gardens, streams flow free, people of all races and religions live in harmony – until the militarist Southlands attack.  How can the people of a peaceful society fight against ruthless invaders without becoming what they’re fighting against?  Musician-turned-guerilla Bird, his story-teller grandmother Maya, and Madrone, the healer, must wield a force more powerful than weapons—the fifth sacred thing In the eighteen years since its publication, hundreds of thousands of people have read The Fifth Sacred Thing and been moved by its imagery and drama. Now, at this time when our future seems so precarious, we want to bring it to the screen and to a whole new generation who are more visual than verbal. Making a movie of a book that so many people love is a scary venture. We feel a huge responsibility — first to be faithful to the book’s artistic vision, to make a film that moves people emotionally, that’s dramatic and funny and edge-of-the-seat powerful. But also, we want to be faithful to the values of earth-care and social justice the book represents. Not just in what the movie portrays, but also in the way we go about making it. We’ve written a Green Plan that will set new standards for environmental accountability in the film industry....

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The Art of Innovation

Walter E. Massey, Ph.D. President of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, President Emeritus of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga. The Art of Innovation Posted: 07/19/2012 3:41 pm Recently I delivered the closing keynote address at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation’s Global University Summit to a group of higher education leaders from around the world on the topic of innovation — or more specifically, “developing talent to drive innovation in a global society.” The audience consisted of presidents, chancellors, and provosts of major research universities from around the world. As president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), I was the lone representative from an art and design school, so I took the opportunity to share what institutions like mine can contribute to global innovation. As a longtime cultural enthusiast, yet somewhat new president of a school of art and design, I have a newfound appreciation for the importance of the kind of education offered by these schools. Subsequently, my views on what drives innovation in society have broadened as a result of being in this new world. As a physicist and erstwhile “science guy,” I have honed my views on innovation through the lens of science and technology — and the established and almost canonical scientific paradigm. An oversimplification of that paradigm goes like this: basic research uncovers new insights and understandings leading to engineering and new products, devices, and methodologies, which then spawns new innovative enterprises. This paradigm was promoted by Vannevar Bush, which led to the founding of the National Science Foundation in the U.S. His seminal report, “The Endless Frontier,” made the case for government support of fundamental research because that underlying research would lead to new intellectual frontiers, which would lead to economic development. This paradigm has worked and in many ways is still valid. However, a closer examination of the innovative process reveals it is not that simple or straightforward. We certainly need more scientists, engineers, and mathematicians, but we may have been missing an opportunity by not more effectively engaging in the innovative process one of the most creative groups in our society — artists and designers. At SAIC, our curriculum is based on an interdisciplinary approach to art, design, and innovation....

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