Venture Artist, Winter Lazerus, interviews photographer Winston Swift Boyer

  On May 17th, at Sacred Cinema: You are cordially invited to a One Evening Artist Salon / Gallery featuring photographs from renowned photographer Winston Swift Boyer‘s “Ocean Series”. Salon opens at 7pm. Sacred Cinema / Besant Lodge 2560 North Beachwood Drive Los Angeles, CA Parking in the neighborhood as always What first drew you to photography? I started my life in Moab, Utah in the 1950s. At that time Moab was a Uranium town. My mother had gone to art school and wanted to be an artist. Bringing up children changed that and she became an elementary school teacher. Between teaching and taking care of us children she would work on her art, wood blocks, sculpting, writing and illustrating children’s stories. My father was a prospector and also had a wonderful sense of the arts. He would always be going to flea markets and come home with things like faded reproductions of impressionist paintings, small folk art sculptures mixed with corroded prospectors’ claw picks, beat up gold panning pans, broken geiger counters, coyote skulls and what not. Needless to say I was surrounded by wonderfully eclectic artifacts, great art, and a fantastic landscape. At an early age, six or so, I started taking pictures with a Brownie camera and became fascinated with taking photographs. That impulse has never left me. What are you looking for in a photograph? I am capturing something that captures me. What other artists inform or influence your work? I do not differentiate photography from other art mediums which gives me the freedom to become immersed in all forms of art. My influences range from the abstract impressionists to primitive art, from Edward Weston to Helmut Newton, from unknown past work to unknown future work. My list is probably infinite. What types of photographic techniques are you exploring the most? My philosophy of photographic technique is that it should be used as a tool and not an end. My interest started as a color photographer. I shot with Kodachrome film and developed my own Cibachrome prints (a printing process for positive film). Kodachrome was never meant to printed it was meant to be projected. When Cibachrome came out it was able to capture the drastic contrast range of Kodachrome....

Learn More

Intimate Interview with Steve Roach

Vortex Immersion Media and the c3: Center for Conscious Creativity are honored to be presenting a three concert series: Ultra Immersion:  Deep, Deeper, Deepest…. in The Vortex Dome by famed electronic musical artist, Steve Roach accompanied by stunning 360 visuals created by visual artist, Audri Phillips. Listen to a podcast of the event here: http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2013/10/31/steve-roach-in-the-vortex-dome/ Kate McCallum, c3 Founder and Executive Director, had the chance to interview Steve about his perspectives on music and the fulldome experience: 1.  How did you get started in music? My path to creating  music primarily  came from an awareness or awakening to the essence of sound thru immersing in long periods of solitary time in deserts, mountains and coastal areas growing up in San Diego. From an early age there was a draw and power in these places that seemed to eclipse the normal trajectory of what I was born into, growing up in the  SoCal baby boomer factory. This feeling I was tapping into something vast and eternal was accessed in a deeper kind of silence and sense of space you can find in the desert for example. This kind of boost into this inner place was filled with sound, before music. This is really the core of my work,  sound emerges first,  and what is called  music in my work grows out of this quality of tone that is inside the sounds I create, the music emerges from this point. 2.  What led you to electronic music? As this awareness of the power of  sound began to evolve within me and become more visceral and all encompassing, the path to using the early synthesizers  was a perfectly timed discovery. These instruments for me were like finding  surgical instruments  for investigating perception and awareness. With these tools and a directed intention you can instantly change the magnification and go way down inside of a sound, revealing emotions and and mental states  not usually accessed in ordinary music, art and the day to day encounters of life or even with the right mind altering agents. Eventually I added other instruments that hold this relationship of  sound as a transformative tool. For example after 2 extended trips through Australia I discovered the didgeridoo in the mid 80s’ before it had made...

Learn More