Networked Rites and the Quest for Morphic Fields of Compassion – Masterclass

Ritualistic Art, the Collective Mind as Creative Artist, and the Serpentine Cosmic DNA Dance of Evolution and Emergence © Dr Lila Moore, 2015 Werner Herzog defines the Chauvet Cave’s paintings the subject of his film Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2011) as art in the ultimate sense of the term. He says: “It goes back to a time when there was, for example, no art market, no exhibitions, no galleries. No doubt in my heart that this is art, and it’s some of the greatest that the human race ever created, period. It can’t get any better, and it hasn’t gotten much better. That’s a great mystery”. (See: Interview) Clearly, every encounter (whether it is in print, online or on screen) with the paintings of Chauvet Cave triggers thoughts on how novelty emerges unexpectedly and evolves human consciousness and history. Despite “the abyss of time,” which according to Herzog, separate us from the early humans that created those images, we still recognize ourselves in their reflections. Images such as the  Panel of the Lions that seem to externalise the beasts’ energy and focus may recall faint memories of interspecies communication which is totally alien to contemporary people. Perhaps we see ourselves reflected in the “intensity of their gaze”. Jill Tarter of SETI (Ted Talk, 2009) cites Loren Eiseley’s statement, “One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human. One day that eye may be that of an intelligent alien, and the sooner we eschew our narrow view of evolution the sooner we can truly explore our ultimate origins and destinations”. Could these paintings that represent the birth of art and the modern human soul, unfold a primordial pattern of evolution that involves the symbiosis of hybrid eyes and intelligence? Perhaps they allow insight to a state of radical compassion through the seeing of oneself in the other? In case they were aspects of ritualistic practice, they stand as the first presentations of elaborate ritualistic art. Although, we may never have a final explanation for the Chauvet Cave’s paintings’ purpose, they clearly brought forward a transformation in consciousness. Morphic Fields  (See: Rupert Sheldrake – Morphic Fields and Cosmic Consciousness) of regions in which rituals have been practised for millennia,...

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James Hood radiates viewers in a bath of light and sound at his Midsummer Ceremony

1. In the beginning of your show, you mentioned how important art and music are to bringing about greater consciousness. Can you explain that connection? Both art and music are powerful modalities in their own right that can on their own bring enormous light and inspiration, and the passion that people can have for either music or art can on its own be totally transformative. My point is that the combination of beautiful music and illuminated sacred art, presented in an immersive experience, almost creates an alchemy with those two elements that creates what I would call a third thing. Some sort of experiential energy that is created from the symbiotic marriage of the music and the art that can provide a possibility of quite easily going into what I would call a meditative state or a reverie. A feeling of inner expansion, a quieting down of the analytical tik-tok mind, that allows what we really are which is this vast pool of intuitive genius, which is totally unique in each one of us, to then be invited forward into an experience where you can play with the deeper parts of yourself. Where you can interact with the higher parts of yourself, the more sublime, more subtle, more supreme parts of yourself. So I think that it’s an incredibly powerful chemical reaction when you’re surrounded by music and you’re surrounded by art, that your conscious mind is flooded with so much information that it can’t possibly take it in so it has to ultimately surrender – or risk overheating from trying to analyze or deduct or compare everything that it is seeing – so that almost everybody who is experiencing this show decides to go the way I hope that they would go, which is to settle down, relax and allow it to flow over you and see what happens then?! And that will be different for everybody. There will be no two experiences that are the same and they will be feeding one’s own unique associations, memories, attractions, aversions. Whatever you’re into. So one can come out of the show and have a completely difference experience than their friend does. It is completely unique for each individual that experiences it. 2. How did...

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An Interview with Robert R. Rhodes – Astro Physics and Beyond

Robert R. Rhodes – Bio While pursuing a doctorate in Physics (with a specialization in Cosmic Ray Physics), I discovered the fun of computer programming for scientific research; in the mid-1970s, this was becoming a much sought-after skill, and lucrative as well – so I added Systems Science as a minor to my graduate program, and saw my GPA rise to 4.0 in the Systems Science courses I took – realizing that my innate skills exceeded any near-term professional demand in this new field, I immediately shifted my career direction to align with this exploding market. For a few years I excelled at the HOW of programming, for geophysicists and ground mission control for satellites, but I really wanted to know the WHY behind the code: so I pursued a system engineering role where I wrote formal specs and algorithms for programmers, where my graduate-level education was essential to understanding “satellite science” (the sister of “rocket science”). Over the 30 years of my career, I would shift my professional focus from system engineer to contract negotiator to network architect to business analyst; each job shift would give me a broader perspective on both technological trends and human needs that could now be addressed. You can plow through an in-depth review of my career activities and associations here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/telkinetikllc I am focusing my explorations on a new science: Neurophysics. I have ever been fascinated by the mind’s inner workings, and I am delighted to discover new theories and experiments in neuroscience every day now, just in time for my explorations. Anticipating the arrival of Kurzweil’s singularity about 2045, I am engaging with scientists and artists alike to see how we can wake the collective consciousness of humanity to futures we, at present, can dimly imagine. Therefore, I participate in worldwide discussions held by online groups – here’s my current list of facebook groups where my musings can be viewed: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2204995088/ CONSCIOUSNESS STUDIES https://www.facebook.com/groups/consciousness.studies/ THE BRAIN CAFE https://www.facebook.com/groups/thebraincafe/ EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY https://www.facebook.com/groups/52551573343/ STANFORD TRANSHUMANISTS https://www.facebook.com/groups/stanfordtranshumanists/ SINGULARITY NETWORK https://www.facebook.com/groups/techsingularity/ For a more focused discussion, you can also ask me questions directly (and others with professional qualifications) here: http://www.quora.com/Robert-Rhodes-5/ See my daily discoveries and musings about anything in the universe at: https://twitter.com/Memera This page below is a constant feed...

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An Inteview with Hilary Marckx – The Rockabilly Minister – A Bigger Picture

Hilary Marckx Bio I have a PH.D. in Theology and the Arts from the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA.  I was self-employed as a documentary/commercial/fine art photographer from 1968 through 2008.  During that period I taught at the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, CA, and wrote and performed songs.  In 1998 I was Ordained in the United Church of Christ, and was called to serve a Disciples of Christ congregation in Geyserville, CA, where I still serve.  I have a wife, Cherie, two children, Shannon and Joel, and three grandchildren, Megan, Brigit, and Liam.  I am owned by a cat. My current involvement in music can be found at  http://www.hfm-swtr.com where my most current musical work can be found.  http://hmarckx.wordpress.com is a blog on my adventures in music where I have something to offer from time to time.   http://hfmbw.wordpress.com is a blog on Black and White photography where I discuss my work in photography.  And  http://hilary.4ormat.com is where you could go to see my photography galleries.  Should you be interested to investigate my Spiritual/Theological ramblings you could go to  http://revdocmarckx.wordpress.com. — HOW DOES TECHNOLOGY FIT INTO THE GRAND SCHEME OF YOUR LIFE? Of course technology fits into my life. First off it was technological advancements of medicine that saved my life when I was 11 years old. Technology developed the three stents I have in my heart, and it saved my wife’s life with each of her rounds of cancer (breast and ovarian). Technology has also been part of my creative career since I began photography in 1957 and still is. Photography is at its heart and soul technological as well as artistic/creative/scientific. I continue to use film and I also utilize my digital systems. When I taught I used multi-projector dissolve systems, and later graduated to LCD projectors and Powerpoint and other presentations. A Computer is as much a part of my creative lifestyle as are my film cameras and enlargers. Music is no different for me. Every musical instrument that exists is a result of some technological advancement or other. I utilize electronics in my recording and performances. I play acoustic guitars, basses, mandolins, banjos, harmonicas, and project them through technological wonders we term microphones and amplifiers. We listen to sounds and...

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Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Part 2: Her Sight and Insight By Lila Moore (Part 1 can be found here.) The heroine’s journey is an evolving myth.  It is not simply a product of ancient times like the hero’s journey, though, there are some archaic texts with leading protagonists who are often goddesses or associated with them. There are also the classics, The Little Mermaid, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and the Wizard’s of Oz that, with rich tapestry of symbols and archetypes, imaginative visuals and soulful depth, present the journey of an extraordinary heroine. This type of heroine, unlike those depicted with nothing to do in recent films, has much to do, discover, overcome and manifest. She is a different type of leader and fighter for justice and nothing like the mythic hero. The hero searches for the meaning of the Soul and a union with Her, often disguised in the form of a princess whom he marries after the successful completion of his ordeal and quest. The mythic heroine as an archetype is the Soul’s manifestation on Earth and in the Cosmos, and here to show us how to transform and evolve. Clearly, each individual heroine’s journey reflects some aspects of the Soul, a story which is part of a much larger story of evolution in consciousness and worldview. There is no way a single heroine could carry the vision and burden of the entire task. Therefore, as a global culture we need many more stories and myths about her journey, new films and interactive platforms and games. The heroine’s journey as a mythic tale is not yet fully known. We will get to know it as we make it, watch and interact with it. It is a vision about the future. It is perhaps no coincidence that the first photorealist, computer-animated science-fiction film portrays the heroine’s journey through the sight and insight of the leading protagonist. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (Dir: Hironobu Sakaguchi, Moto Sakakibara, 2001) is led by the character Doctor Aki Ross, a scientist who has discovered how to save the Earth from an infectious, deadly virus-like race of aliens called Phantoms. From the very start of the film, the post apocalyptic landscape of Earth and the ruins of New York City are seen...

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Whose Gaze is it?  Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Part I: Introduction to the Gaze By Lila Moore There is a subtle exchange, an invisible interplay, between images and viewers in the cinema which induces emotions and meanings. As the Kuleshov Effect shows, meanings are generated by the viewers as a result of a cognitive processing of the film’s assembly of visual data. Alfred Hitchcock demonstrated the Kuleshov Effect in a 1964 CBC documentary as a manipulative editing technique that invites the viewers to make meaningful sense of the way the images on screen interrelate and unfold. Alfred Hitchcock explains the Kuleshov Effect to host-director Fletcher Markle, CBC, 1964. Hitchcock’s choice of images and their subsequent meanings also highlight socially established conventions and sexual difference that have controlled the structure and form of film, media and popular culture for decades. The female character in Hitchcock’s montage is dominated by the male gaze as an object of affection (mother) or a (dirty) sex object (the girl in bikini as seen by a dirty old man). She has no active role, or individual consciousness and meaning-making facility, beyond her service to the male gaze. The latter consists of the gaze of the hero, the male viewer, and the point of view of the camera that ensures the patriarchal order. The female viewer, like the female character, is subordinated to the same gaze. What he sees and feels must be right. She is what he makes of her. As Laura Mulvey implied, the woman is the image and not the maker of meanings. The male gaze is a term coined by Mulvey in her seminal essay Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema, (1975). Laura Malvey Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema Examples Regardless of progress made in theory and film practice since the emergence of feminist film theory in the 1970s, it is still relevant to question the often covert patriarchal worldview represented by the male gaze in popular visual culture.  It is also essential to ponder on the reasons for the lack in heroines that can bravely determine the destiny of their journeys and embody our global and collective myths. Tasha Robinson’s article We are Losing all our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome discusses the gradual, and often covert, disempowerment of female characters in mainstream cinema....

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Study With Master Philosopher Pierre Grimes

It is an honor for c3 to support the work of the legendary philosopher Pierre Grimes. 1) Alan Watts has called you a “true Jnana Yogi.” Could you explain to us what that tradition is, and its significance to the modern spiritual seeker? The furthermost reach of the mind brings Man to discover the meaning of existence and the source of that existence. There are different spiritual practices and forms of yoga designed to achieve that goal and Jnana Yoga is the way of wisdom. The classical philosophers of the Hellenics, from Xenophanes through Plato, Plotinus to Damascius, called this Jnana Yoga the elements of theology. Their counterpart in Tibetan Buddhism is the yoga or method of realizing Nirvana through knowing the mind, which can be found in the four-volume work on Tibetan Buddhism edited by Evan-Wentz, and other Tibetan Buddhist works. Our Jnana Yoga looks into the wisdom traditions’ most profound teachings for insights into the way the mind can come to know the mind, along with identifying and removing the blocks to achieving that noblest of goals, knowing thy Self and discovering its source. Contemporary seekers are not aware of the richness of this way of wisdom and so resort to a variety of spiritual disciplines and secondary devices to achieve enlightenment. 2) How did you come to found the Opening Mind Academy? Opening Mind Academy began after Chong-An S’nim of the Korean Chogye Ch’an Sect observed my practice of philosophical midwifery over a period of time, and challenged me to give talks at his temple on his translation of the Diamond Sutra in order to demonstrate to myself that I was a true teacher. From this exchange, I and Chong-An S’nim created the Opening Mind Academy as a higher unity implicit in each of our spiritual traditions. Each of the profound traditions of Ch’an Buddhism and Platonism is aware of the significance of both understanding and experiencing the inner mind to perceive the nature of what has been called enlightenment. Thus, the goal of the OMA is to integrate the rational understanding with the contemplative tradition and to open the mind to the truth which from the beginning has been innately available to us. 3) You are an expert in classical...

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Venture Artist, Winter Lazerus, interviews photographer Winston Swift Boyer

  On May 17th, at Sacred Cinema: You are cordially invited to a One Evening Artist Salon / Gallery featuring photographs from renowned photographer Winston Swift Boyer‘s “Ocean Series”. Salon opens at 7pm. Sacred Cinema / Besant Lodge 2560 North Beachwood Drive Los Angeles, CA Parking in the neighborhood as always What first drew you to photography? I started my life in Moab, Utah in the 1950s. At that time Moab was a Uranium town. My mother had gone to art school and wanted to be an artist. Bringing up children changed that and she became an elementary school teacher. Between teaching and taking care of us children she would work on her art, wood blocks, sculpting, writing and illustrating children’s stories. My father was a prospector and also had a wonderful sense of the arts. He would always be going to flea markets and come home with things like faded reproductions of impressionist paintings, small folk art sculptures mixed with corroded prospectors’ claw picks, beat up gold panning pans, broken geiger counters, coyote skulls and what not. Needless to say I was surrounded by wonderfully eclectic artifacts, great art, and a fantastic landscape. At an early age, six or so, I started taking pictures with a Brownie camera and became fascinated with taking photographs. That impulse has never left me. What are you looking for in a photograph? I am capturing something that captures me. What other artists inform or influence your work? I do not differentiate photography from other art mediums which gives me the freedom to become immersed in all forms of art. My influences range from the abstract impressionists to primitive art, from Edward Weston to Helmut Newton, from unknown past work to unknown future work. My list is probably infinite. What types of photographic techniques are you exploring the most? My philosophy of photographic technique is that it should be used as a tool and not an end. My interest started as a color photographer. I shot with Kodachrome film and developed my own Cibachrome prints (a printing process for positive film). Kodachrome was never meant to printed it was meant to be projected. When Cibachrome came out it was able to capture the drastic contrast range of Kodachrome....

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Transformative Views: Lights, Camera and Transformation

Transformation and again transformation, the eternal entertainment of the eternal spirit. J. W. Goethe   Transformation is described by C.G. Jung as the “the basic instinct of civilization.” The desire to transform is embedded in our body and psyche. Transformation is an unstoppable impulse, and the aspiration to reveal the often invisible trends that drive it forward is as inescapable. We are destined to transform as creatures of nature and evolution. As transforming conscious beings, we express and explore our transformations not only in biological terms. Transformation happens through the unique products; technological and scientific inventions and metaphysical and conceptual revelations, of our culture. Transformation, as a deeply felt visceral and spiritual experience is an integral part of our interaction with pivotal works of art in any aesthetic medium. It is also the underlying function of religious and spiritual, myths, rites and practices throughout the ages. This column is dedicated to transformation as a motif, archetype, and aesthetic, scientific and technological factor and method. It seeks to explore transformative imagery, text and performative actions as they transpire in 2D & 3D film/video, time-based art, and as part of online, interactive, virtual and immersive environments and technologies. Here, we shall ask, can the moving image and time-based, interactive and immersive aesthetics reclaim and/or evolve art’s ritualistic, transformative and healing heritage and function, and how. In addition, what are the current transformative potentials of Artivism? This is a valid query as the strategies and aesthetics of art and activism are often expressed and operate differently. Here we engage in the exploration of the needs for transformative content, and the innovative and aesthetic ways through which transformative elements are implemented in contemporary works and settings. Moreover, this column celebrates transformation as a cyclic movement forward and as aesthetic and technological evolution which honors its terrestrial Gaian origins. Since the late 1960s, modern technology has brought the Earth and the Universe to people’s awareness through perpetual streams of striking images. Views of Earth from space and the sight of almost any geographical location in the world have become freely available. Likewise, the overall impact of human activity on the natural environment is visible to virtually everyone. It is clear that humanity has been transforming the natural environment for...

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The Gap – (Global Artistic Pulse)

Between art and technology – 2014 cjkoepfinger Ghandi once said that you can tell the health of a nation by the way it treats its animals, I would like to borrow that metaphor yet rephrase it to fit here in our discussions. You can tell the spiritual health of world by the way it treats and appreciates its artists – but then again the animal and the artist have much in common. Driven by instinctual passion, both will dig to find a bone and often have to bark continuously till they get the attention of there masters. The second half of the 20th century was a sad state of affairs for many the struggling artists. What started out as a boom in the swinging sixties shortly fizzled out in the seventies and eighties and corporate greed and commodity education soon tuned the anthem of the times. Liberal arts degrees soon became communication careers and man’s search for truth, beauty and meaning hopelessly lost somewhere in the collective consciousness. Thankfully the century soon enough came to an end and the creative pulse began picking up thanks to technology. With new ways to discovery, it seemed as if the ransom of the age was being paid and the hostages who sought the arts set free again. With computers to work faster, leisure time was reconsidered. The cyber world soon created a doorway for new dimensions in imagination. And with this emerged a new artist – a new hybrid storyteller, who can respond to his or her muse at the touch of a button. Welcome to cyberspace – Alice has finally found wonder land – a place to wonder and wander beyond the ordinary lines of space and time. Here we can boldly go to create an alternative life that suits our fancy – here we can connect with others ad infinitum and beyond – here you can literally explore limitless possibilities – now knowing that we are – alas, infinite yet bound only by the guidelines of our own imagineering. It almost feels like we are able to fly. Maybe this is exactly what flying feels like – at least now we can flock together with other like minds. Today we can consciously create new images...

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Waterwheel World

Water Day Symposium – 3WDS14 FROM 17-23 MARCH 2014, more than 200 people from 5 continents will present their latest work about water. Children, youth, communities, TED talkers, scientists, activists and artists will interact with audience online and in 18 nodes (physical venues) in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Morocco, New Zealand, Poland, USA, Taiwan & Tunisia. The entire symposium will be streamed online via Waterwheel platform for audiences to watch and interact from their own computers anywhere in the world, free of charge! WATER VIEWS: CARING AND DARING is this year’s symposium theme. The program is composed of 42 sessions, caters to all time zones, and focuses on art, science and activism. It explores questions about how we are living, and will continue to live, with water and its contrasts. Demands for new perceptions and approaches to water management, urban planning, and cooperation, as well as renewed respect for water as a vital resource and shared heritage are highlighted through transdisciplinary approaches. Waterwheel was created two and a half years ago, by an Australian team – Inkahoots, Igneous and Suzon Fuks who initiated the platform on the basis of her main interests: water issues and “networked performance” or performance on the internet that uses mass communication tools. Fuks is a Brisbane-based experimental artist, choreographer and director, committed to making and developing art that examines, reflects upon, and helps us survive today’s disjointed worlds. Originally from Belgian where water is in abundance, she became aware of the issues and politics around water in the early 90’s after living for three years in a place in India where access to water regulated life. When she moved to Brisbane, Australia she witnessed the impact of severe drought for several years and then big floods in the city. These events led her to conceive Waterwheel which she initially researched and developed with a fellowship from Australia Council for the Arts. It has been formulated as an ongoing project open to all, for cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural water-related dialogues and exchanges around the globe. The Waterwheel platform is built on water vocabulary evoking the parallel between the theme of water and the Internet. The metaphoric interrelation between the planetary currents of water and the electronic transference of...

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Intimate Interview with Steve Roach

Vortex Immersion Media and the c3: Center for Conscious Creativity are honored to be presenting a three concert series: Ultra Immersion:  Deep, Deeper, Deepest…. in The Vortex Dome by famed electronic musical artist, Steve Roach accompanied by stunning 360 visuals created by visual artist, Audri Phillips. Listen to a podcast of the event here: http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2013/10/31/steve-roach-in-the-vortex-dome/ Kate McCallum, c3 Founder and Executive Director, had the chance to interview Steve about his perspectives on music and the fulldome experience: 1.  How did you get started in music? My path to creating  music primarily  came from an awareness or awakening to the essence of sound thru immersing in long periods of solitary time in deserts, mountains and coastal areas growing up in San Diego. From an early age there was a draw and power in these places that seemed to eclipse the normal trajectory of what I was born into, growing up in the  SoCal baby boomer factory. This feeling I was tapping into something vast and eternal was accessed in a deeper kind of silence and sense of space you can find in the desert for example. This kind of boost into this inner place was filled with sound, before music. This is really the core of my work,  sound emerges first,  and what is called  music in my work grows out of this quality of tone that is inside the sounds I create, the music emerges from this point. 2.  What led you to electronic music? As this awareness of the power of  sound began to evolve within me and become more visceral and all encompassing, the path to using the early synthesizers  was a perfectly timed discovery. These instruments for me were like finding  surgical instruments  for investigating perception and awareness. With these tools and a directed intention you can instantly change the magnification and go way down inside of a sound, revealing emotions and and mental states  not usually accessed in ordinary music, art and the day to day encounters of life or even with the right mind altering agents. Eventually I added other instruments that hold this relationship of  sound as a transformative tool. For example after 2 extended trips through Australia I discovered the didgeridoo in the mid 80s’ before it had made...

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