c3: MindLAB

c3 : MindLAB

Executive Director – Dana Klisanin

The c3: MindLAB is a research and project development Lab focused on emerging findings in creativity and innovation theory, neuroscience, consciousness studies, transpersonal psychology and integral studies in relationship to the arts, media and communication technologies and their use to create and drive solutions for evolving human potential and cultural evolution.

Dana Klisanin
DANA KLISANIN is passionate about using the arts, media, and technology to encourage people to recognize their essential interdependence with the natural world, each other, and their own divine essence. As an author, psychologist, and social entrepreneur, Dana is committed to creating, promoting, and assisting in the development of media that encourages people to live consciously. To facilitate that end, she has pioneered a new “integral media” framework for the creation of “conscious media” __ media designed to support conscious evolution and the societal emergence of planetary consciousness. The conscious media model supports a global renaissance of human values and a profound shift in our relationship with the natural world.
Dana earned her Ph.D. in psychology from Saybrook University. She is the author of numerous articles and is a frequent presenter at conferences throughout North America, Asia, and Europe. Her research interests arise from the fields of systems science, integral theory, and transpersonal psychology. Dana is the Founder of Evolutionary Guidance Media R&D, Inc, a think-tank and creative cauldron devoted to the design and evaluation, of conscious media, socially responsible media, green media, and transformative media.

As Executive Director of the c3:MindLAB Dana focuses on bringing emerging findings in creativity and innovation theory, consciousness studies, transpersonal psychology, and integral studies into synergistic relationship with the arts, media and communication technologies for the purpose of creating and driving solutions for evolving human potential and cultural evolutionDana is a member of the American Psychological Association; Association of Transpersonal Psychology; International Society for the Systems Sciences; World Futures Studies Federation; World Future Society; and the UK Systems Society.

For more information visit:

www.DanaKlisanin.com 

Altruism in the Digital Age

Posted on Jan 10, 2014 in c3:MindLAB

Altruism in the Digital Age

Increasingly digital platforms are encouraging us to bring out our selfless side online. By Kharunya Paramaguru     @Kharunya Dec. 02, 2013 When the Oxford Dictionary announced this month that “selfie” was its word of the year—noting that its use in the English language had increased by 17,000% in the past year—it confirmed in the minds of some that the open architecture of the web and social media has enabled us to “look like raging narcissists.” But as the number of digital platforms designed to encourage sharing, helping and giving—often with no tangible reward for users—proliferate, the web appears to be allowing our selfless, rather than selfish, side to thrive. Altruism and philanthropy are hardly new to the web: many charities have successfully moved their fundraising operations online, taking advantage of platforms like Twitter, Facebook and JustGiving. But as Tom Serres, CEO and founder of Rally.org, an online fundraising platform for individual causes, points out, the online social infrastructure that allows fundraisers to take advantage of these platforms has only come to prominence in the last four to five years. “From that perspective, it’s not necessarily a new behavior, but a behavior in a new medium that’s being done,” says Serres. Dana Klisanin, a U.S.-based psychologist, suggests that the Internet is indeed giving rise to new avenues for altruism. She refers to this as “digital altruism”— simply meaning altruism that’s mediated by digital technology—and suggests that it is an understudied area because so much media attention is focused on negative behaviors online, like cyber-bullying or cyber-crime. Klisanin has suggested three categories for various degrees of online altruism. This includes “every day digital altruism” where individuals click to donate to a charity, to creative digital altruism where users design websites or platforms to help others, to co-creative projects where groups or corporations come together to produce something for the “greater good”—like the UN working with online humanitarian volunteers to help with relief efforts following typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. One project that embraces the idea of an altruistic social network is Impossible, an app created by British model Lily Cole. Impossible, which joined the Apple app store in September, is a platform based on the principles of gift exchange, where users can request wishes or grant them to others. The key is that it is free and there is no expectation of return. Wishes range from the very practical: “I wish for someone to design a website for my event” to the philosophical: “I wish for everyone to live in peace.” Kwame Ferreira, 35-year-old founder of Kwamecorp, a global tech innovation company that has helped to develop Impossible, admits that he was “scared” and skeptical of Cole’s idea when she first approached him. But, says Ferreira, it is an idea whose time has come. “Most social networks have done a wonderful job of connecting people, but they consume each other. You go through experiences and you ‘like’ things, but what about a shift, where it’s not about consuming but it’s actually about giving? That’s why we have ‘thank yous’ instead of ‘likes.’ It’s a subtle nuance, but a very important one.” Ferreira rejects the idea that the concept of a free gift exchange is too idealistic: “It’s not a left-wing hippy culture. Everybody gives. It’s part of most cultures.” Cole, who graduated from Cambridge University in 2011, presented her idea during a debate at her...

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Digital Human BBC Radio Series

Posted on Oct 29, 2013 in c3:MindLAB

Digital Human BBC Radio Series

Aleks Krotoski charts how digital culture is moulding modern living. Each week join technology journalist Aleks Krotoski as she goes beyond the latest gadget or web innovation to understand what sort of world we’re creating with our ‘always on’ lives. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03c2zw6 Altruism Series 4 Episode 1 of 6 Duration: 30 minutes Aleks Krotoski explores what technology tells us about ourselves and the age we live in. In this first programme; is the digital world allowing us to be more altruistic than ever? So does altruism exist online? With all the stories of cyber-bullying and trolling it’s very easy to forget the random acts of kindness that the technology also allows. Aleks explores some amazing stories of online altruism. But when no good deed goes unpublished and you can keep score of your goodness through ‘followers’, ‘likes’ and the accompanying boosts to ego and reputation is truly selfless altruism online an impossibility? And in the end, if good gets done does it matter? Contributors: Primatologist Frans De Waal, Psychologist Dana Kilsanin, Founder of Random acts of pizza Daniel Rodgers, YouTube DIY guru Chez Rossi. Producer: Peter McManus.  ...

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Media Saturation & Your Health

Posted on Aug 15, 2013 in c3:MindLAB

Media Saturation & Your Health

Mindfulness and moderation are keys to healthy living in a media saturated world. Published in www.psychologytoday.com on August 14, 2013 by Dana Klisanin, Ph.D. in Digital Altruism Now more than ever our lives are saturated with media—from email to Twitter, Facebook to Instagram, Linked-in to Netflix—television, video games, instant messaging, and web-surfing. Even our youngest children are busy swiping their way across e-readers, i-Pads, and tablets. Through our willingness to adopt these technologies, we are willingly engaging in one of the largest experiments in our evolutionary history—an experiment with biological, social, and ethical impacts. At the recent Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, (APA), I met with colleagues in the Society for Media Psychology and Technology (Division 46)— to review current research and scholarship in this burgeoning specialization. For readers unfamiliar with this area, media psychology includes research and applications dealing with all forms of media technologies: Traditional and mass media, such as radio, television, film, video, newsprint, magazines, music, and art as well as new and emerging technologies and applications, such as social media, mobile media, interface design, educational technologies, interactive media technologies, and augmented, virtual and blended environments. Two important “take aways” from the meeting include: Expect a continuing escalation of media saturation. The launch of the Google Glass in December is expected to usher in the “era of augmented reality.” You might have already seen or purchased children’s books with this technology. If not, here’s a sample. Expectations are that Google Glass will be replaced by augmented reality “contact lenses”. While we continue to conduct and compile research on the impacts of various forms of media and interactive technologies on both adults and children (including television, video games, smart phone use, augmented reality, etc.) across a variety of dimensions (biological, emotional, social, ethical, etc.) results are inconclusive. Expect the situation to remain this way for some time—scientific studies must be replicated and longitudinal studies take time. Instead of waiting for scientists to provide definitive answers to the impact of media and interactive technologies on your health, I recommend taking a holistic approach by practicing mindfulness and the tried and true virtue of moderation. Mindfulness involves bringing conscious awareness to your media use habits. For example, when someone is talking to you don’t let “apps” come between you, especially where children are concerned. These are “monkey see monkey do” moments—give your children, and other family members and friends your full attention and expect them to do the same.  To mitigate potentially harmful biological effects from electromagnetic frequencies (EMFs) and radiofrequency radiation (RFR) don’t sleep near your smart phone and/or computers. Mindfulness also involves an awareness of the restorative power of the natural world. For millions of years humanity has evolved and flourished through being immersed in nature. Nature’s textures, colors, sights, and sounds, are familiar to us. They have a calming influence—color science shows that shades of green and blue are the best hues for living rooms and bedrooms because they induce a state of relaxation. The science behind colors is used in marketing (here’s a good post by Leo Widrich on the topic). One experiment at Stanford’s Calming Technology Labinvolved covering a desktop with organic grass (living lawn grass) to test its potential as a stress reducer. You can use color science and balance your interactions with technology by making time to go outside, spending time in your backyard, or a local park—sitting in the green grass, and gazing at...

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THE FUTURIST Interview with Dana Klisanin, Creator of the Cyberhero League

Posted on Jul 30, 2012 in c3:MindLAB

THE FUTURIST Interviews Dana Klisanin, Creator of the Cyberhero League Several technologies and social innovations were featured in the second Futurists: BetaLaunch (F:BL) invention expo, part of the recently-concluded WorldFuture 2012 conference Dream. Design. Develop. Deliver. (Toronto July 27-29). F:BL is a “petting zoo” where WorldFuture attendees can interact with artifacts from the future and engage with the exhibitors. Below is an interview between THE FUTURIST magazine and Dana Klisanin, CEO, Evolutionary Guidance Media R&D, Inc. and creator of the Cyberhero League, a social platform that will enable children to actively impact the welfare of people, animals, and the environment through everyday activities, and one of ten F:BL winners. CYBERHERO LEAGUE FOUNDER DANA KLISANIN THE FUTURIST: Who is involved in your innovative project? Names and titles, project groups, inside and outside agencies—be as specific as you like/are able to be. Klisanin: I designed Cyberhero League as a project of Evolutionary Guidance Media R&D, Inc. Our team, who share the intention of using the arts and media to co-create a better world, includes: Transmedia Producer, Kate McCallum; Creative Director, Melisca Klisanin; Lead Artist and Graphic Designer, Anastasia Kilani; IT Project Manager, Bridget Arrington; Graphic Designer, Josias Hernandez. Outside Game Design Consultation services provided by Pascal Luban of GD Studio; and freelance Game Development by Keefer Sery and Steward Hiltenbrand. My niece, TigerLily Klisanin-Ross, who attends Quest to Learn, a public school created by game designers at Institute of Play, serves as Youth Advisor. We’re currently creating a “hero-network” of approximately 45 non-profit organizations, starting with: The Millennium Project (Art and Media Node), c3: Center for Conscious Creativity, The Converging World, Pachamama Alliance, and Raincatchers. Our growing list of strategic relationships and advisors includes: Dan Mapes of MagNet Solutions; Ed Lantz of Vortex Immersion Media, Howard Esbin of Prelude, Gary Tomchuk of AwareGuide, and Jessica Chamberlin of Creative Human Capital. THE FUTURIST: What is your professional and educational background? Klisanin: As a psychologist, my background is in humanistic, transpersonal, and integral approaches to individual and societal wellness. I earned my Ph.D. from Saybrook University, an institution founded by pioneers of the humanistic psychology movement. While there, I began exploring the use and potential of the expressive arts as a means of supporting the development of character strengths and virtues. Ultimately, that research led me to ask how the arts and media might be used to promote planetary consciousness in a societal context. Cyberhero League is especially relevant to my scientific investigations in the area of evolutionary guidance media, an integral framework I designed to support the creation, use, and evaluation of media that aims to guide the evolutionary development of body, mind, and spirit, in self, culture, and nature. It was through this integral media framework that I began exploring digital altruism and the cyberhero archetype—two essential elements of the Cyberhero League project. THE FUTURIST: What inspired you—or your team—to develop your innovation that you entered into Futurists: BetaLaunch? Klisanin: Children are learning about global challenges, especially human-caused global warming and social inequality, but have limited power to affect the world. I am concerned that this lack of empowerment leads to feelings of helplessness, apathy, and depression, that continue into adulthood. Our innovation is designed to teach children 21st century skills, such as empathy, altruism, and compassion, through providing them with the means to help other people, animals, and the environment. By...

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Introducing the Cyberhero Archetype

Posted on Jul 12, 2012 in c3:MindLAB

Introducing the Cyberhero Archetype

“Technology is destructive only in the hands of people who do not realize that they are one and the same process as the universe.” Alan Watts  If you’ve turned on the radio, watched television, gone to the movies, or visited Facebook, chances are you’ve seen or heard someone talking about cyber-crime, cyberbullies, and maybe even the threat of cyber-war.  With all this talk of negativity and the Net, you might have drawn the conclusion that nothing good is going on in cyberspace. No one could blame you for drawing this conclusion, but fortunately, nothing could be further from the truth. In recent research exploring the positive use of the Internet, I found that well over 100 million individuals are engaging in online activities with the intention of helping other people, animals, and the environment. Many of these individuals are engaging in daily acts of digital goodness—acts of digital altruism and digital activism. The most committed among them represent a new form of the hero archetype: the cyberhero. To read this entire article please visit:...

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