c3 FutureVision Editorial

The c3 FutureVision editorial blog features curated or original content relevant to the mission of the c3.  Articles may be informational and deal with trends and new technologies emerging in the arts and media landscape, or reflective and more about the philosophical and social aspects of the arts and media.

We welcome submissions and suggestions for topics.  Contact Editor, Nijole Sparkis:  nijole@consciouscreativity.org.

Networked Rites and the Quest for Morphic Fields of Compassion – Masterclass

Posted on Jun 29, 2015 in Blog, Lila Moore

Networked Rites and the Quest for Morphic Fields of Compassion – Masterclass

Ritualistic Art, the Collective Mind as Creative Artist, and the Serpentine Cosmic DNA Dance of Evolution and Emergence © Dr Lila Moore, 2015 Werner Herzog defines the Chauvet Cave’s paintings the subject of his film Cave of Forgotten Dreams (2011) as art in the ultimate sense of the term. He says: “It goes back to a time when there was, for example, no art market, no exhibitions, no galleries. No doubt in my heart that this is art, and it’s some of the greatest that the human race ever created, period. It can’t get any better, and it hasn’t gotten much better. That’s a great mystery”. (See: Interview) Clearly, every encounter (whether it is in print, online or on screen) with the paintings of Chauvet Cave triggers thoughts on how novelty emerges unexpectedly and evolves human consciousness and history. Despite “the abyss of time,” which according to Herzog, separate us from the early humans that created those images, we still recognize ourselves in their reflections. Images such as the  Panel of the Lions that seem to externalise the beasts’ energy and focus may recall faint memories of interspecies communication which is totally alien to contemporary people. Perhaps we see ourselves reflected in the “intensity of their gaze”. Jill Tarter of SETI (Ted Talk, 2009) cites Loren Eiseley’s statement, “One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human. One day that eye may be that of an intelligent alien, and the sooner we eschew our narrow view of evolution the sooner we can truly explore our ultimate origins and destinations”. Could these paintings that represent the birth of art and the modern human soul, unfold a primordial pattern of evolution that involves the symbiosis of hybrid eyes and intelligence? Perhaps they allow insight to a state of radical compassion through the seeing of oneself in the other? In case they were aspects of ritualistic practice, they stand as the first presentations of elaborate ritualistic art. Although, we may never have a final explanation for the Chauvet Cave’s paintings’ purpose, they clearly brought forward a transformation in consciousness. Morphic Fields  (See: Rupert Sheldrake – Morphic Fields and Cosmic Consciousness) of regions in which rituals have been practised for millennia, and where interspecies communication is involved, may retain patterns relating to evolution and emergence, which are best expressed through the creative fields. The Masterclass takes place in conjunction with a ceremony that reflects serpent rites and mythology typical of the Aegean region. Rupert Sheldrake – Morphic Fields and Cosmic Consciousness Master of transformations, the serpent comes in many guises. In mystical texts across various traditions, it often holds a dualistic function as the enlightening one; the opener of eyes and the leader of the way. Its wisdom is gained through a deadly initiation, in order to find the way one has to lose it first. In the Zohar, the body of writings known as the Kabbalah, there is a mythic correlation between the snake and the way, which is the path the seeker chooses to take in life.  The snake reflects the dance of opposites and the way’s twofold nature, the sacredness which is above it and the impurity that lies underneath it. The tempting aspect of the way reveals the world to the seeker...

read more

James Hood radiates viewers in a bath of light and sound at his Midsummer Ceremony

Posted on Jul 16, 2014 in Blog, Nijole Sparkis

James Hood radiates viewers in a bath of light and sound at his Midsummer Ceremony

1. In the beginning of your show, you mentioned how important art and music are to bringing about greater consciousness. Can you explain that connection? Both art and music are powerful modalities in their own right that can on their own bring enormous light and inspiration, and the passion that people can have for either music or art can on its own be totally transformative. My point is that the combination of beautiful music and illuminated sacred art, presented in an immersive experience, almost creates an alchemy with those two elements that creates what I would call a third thing. Some sort of experiential energy that is created from the symbiotic marriage of the music and the art that can provide a possibility of quite easily going into what I would call a meditative state or a reverie. A feeling of inner expansion, a quieting down of the analytical tik-tok mind, that allows what we really are which is this vast pool of intuitive genius, which is totally unique in each one of us, to then be invited forward into an experience where you can play with the deeper parts of yourself. Where you can interact with the higher parts of yourself, the more sublime, more subtle, more supreme parts of yourself. So I think that it’s an incredibly powerful chemical reaction when you’re surrounded by music and you’re surrounded by art, that your conscious mind is flooded with so much information that it can’t possibly take it in so it has to ultimately surrender – or risk overheating from trying to analyze or deduct or compare everything that it is seeing – so that almost everybody who is experiencing this show decides to go the way I hope that they would go, which is to settle down, relax and allow it to flow over you and see what happens then?! And that will be different for everybody. There will be no two experiences that are the same and they will be feeding one’s own unique associations, memories, attractions, aversions. Whatever you’re into. So one can come out of the show and have a completely difference experience than their friend does. It is completely unique for each individual that experiences it. 2. How did you come up with the concept for a performance in the 360 degree Dome? We’ve been scouting out planetariums for quite some time. I have had a planetarium show in the past. It wasn’t something that I was directly involved in, but Moodswings’ first album, “Moodfood” had a show that was created around that album which was very successful in the states. A planetarium in Florida called Bradenton decided to make a show which was quite successful and ran for a couple of years. It was a logical extension of previous shows like Laserium and other kinds of rock shows that you could go into a planetarium and listen to Pink Floyd’s music. So I’ve been thinking about the power of combining my music with art that is like its visual twin. The logical extension of this is what I would call Immersive Entertainment. And then through a series of perfect happenings, we were introduced to Ed and Kate from Vortex Immersion Media. That’s how we ultimately did the show in the Dome in Los...

read more

An Interview with Robert R. Rhodes – Astro Physics and Beyond

Posted on Jul 9, 2014 in Blog, Coni Koepfinger

An Interview with Robert R. Rhodes – Astro Physics and Beyond

Robert R. Rhodes – Bio While pursuing a doctorate in Physics (with a specialization in Cosmic Ray Physics), I discovered the fun of computer programming for scientific research; in the mid-1970s, this was becoming a much sought-after skill, and lucrative as well – so I added Systems Science as a minor to my graduate program, and saw my GPA rise to 4.0 in the Systems Science courses I took – realizing that my innate skills exceeded any near-term professional demand in this new field, I immediately shifted my career direction to align with this exploding market. For a few years I excelled at the HOW of programming, for geophysicists and ground mission control for satellites, but I really wanted to know the WHY behind the code: so I pursued a system engineering role where I wrote formal specs and algorithms for programmers, where my graduate-level education was essential to understanding “satellite science” (the sister of “rocket science”). Over the 30 years of my career, I would shift my professional focus from system engineer to contract negotiator to network architect to business analyst; each job shift would give me a broader perspective on both technological trends and human needs that could now be addressed. You can plow through an in-depth review of my career activities and associations here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/telkinetikllc I am focusing my explorations on a new science: Neurophysics. I have ever been fascinated by the mind’s inner workings, and I am delighted to discover new theories and experiments in neuroscience every day now, just in time for my explorations. Anticipating the arrival of Kurzweil’s singularity about 2045, I am engaging with scientists and artists alike to see how we can wake the collective consciousness of humanity to futures we, at present, can dimly imagine. Therefore, I participate in worldwide discussions held by online groups – here’s my current list of facebook groups where my musings can be viewed: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2204995088/ CONSCIOUSNESS STUDIES https://www.facebook.com/groups/consciousness.studies/ THE BRAIN CAFE https://www.facebook.com/groups/thebraincafe/ EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY https://www.facebook.com/groups/52551573343/ STANFORD TRANSHUMANISTS https://www.facebook.com/groups/stanfordtranshumanists/ SINGULARITY NETWORK https://www.facebook.com/groups/techsingularity/ For a more focused discussion, you can also ask me questions directly (and others with professional qualifications) here: http://www.quora.com/Robert-Rhodes-5/ See my daily discoveries and musings about anything in the universe at: https://twitter.com/Memera This page below is a constant feed of new developments provided by my own personal research staff (as I like to think of them): https://www.facebook.com/robert.rhodes.16100 My friend connections on this page are truly the most prolific investigators I have ever met. Finally, the brand new website memera.net (future, no pages up just yet) will be my new research / corporate vehicle which I will develop in the near future as the online reference library for my exploratory research, ongoing projects, service offerings, and collaboration enabler. Probable focus areas on the memera website will be: consciousness theories, cognitive science, machine (aka “artificial”) intelligence, and artistic / musical / theatrical / cinema collaborations. – HOW DOES TECHNOLOGY FIT INTO THE GRAND SCHEME OF YOUR LIFE? Growing up right after World War II, I always regarded the timing of my life as most fortunate for a guy who wanted to know how EVERYTHING worked – science had taken center stage at the universities, new technologies were springing up everywhere to make our lives easier, our confidence for peace higher, our hope for economic mobility higher...

read more

An Inteview with Hilary Marckx – The Rockabilly Minister – A Bigger Picture

Posted on Jul 9, 2014 in Blog, Coni Koepfinger

An Inteview with Hilary Marckx – The Rockabilly Minister – A Bigger Picture

Hilary Marckx Bio I have a PH.D. in Theology and the Arts from the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA.  I was self-employed as a documentary/commercial/fine art photographer from 1968 through 2008.  During that period I taught at the Pacific School of Religion, Berkeley, CA, and wrote and performed songs.  In 1998 I was Ordained in the United Church of Christ, and was called to serve a Disciples of Christ congregation in Geyserville, CA, where I still serve.  I have a wife, Cherie, two children, Shannon and Joel, and three grandchildren, Megan, Brigit, and Liam.  I am owned by a cat. My current involvement in music can be found at  http://www.hfm-swtr.com where my most current musical work can be found.  http://hmarckx.wordpress.com is a blog on my adventures in music where I have something to offer from time to time.   http://hfmbw.wordpress.com is a blog on Black and White photography where I discuss my work in photography.  And  http://hilary.4ormat.com is where you could go to see my photography galleries.  Should you be interested to investigate my Spiritual/Theological ramblings you could go to  http://revdocmarckx.wordpress.com. — HOW DOES TECHNOLOGY FIT INTO THE GRAND SCHEME OF YOUR LIFE? Of course technology fits into my life. First off it was technological advancements of medicine that saved my life when I was 11 years old. Technology developed the three stents I have in my heart, and it saved my wife’s life with each of her rounds of cancer (breast and ovarian). Technology has also been part of my creative career since I began photography in 1957 and still is. Photography is at its heart and soul technological as well as artistic/creative/scientific. I continue to use film and I also utilize my digital systems. When I taught I used multi-projector dissolve systems, and later graduated to LCD projectors and Powerpoint and other presentations. A Computer is as much a part of my creative lifestyle as are my film cameras and enlargers. Music is no different for me. Every musical instrument that exists is a result of some technological advancement or other. I utilize electronics in my recording and performances. I play acoustic guitars, basses, mandolins, banjos, harmonicas, and project them through technological wonders we term microphones and amplifiers. We listen to sounds and words on speakers that project the result of electronically produced waves that reach our ears in ways wonderfully miraculous. I write, record, sing, create and live by virtue of technology. HOW DOES TECHNOLOGY ENHANCE YOUR WORK? Once I take the time to learn the medium. Technology allows me better access to my own, personal, creative processes. Fluidity in any particular medium offers a more open response to creative insights. I have never experienced what is commonly understood as “writer’s block.” My problem is quite the opposite: shutting it down so I can have a little down time. I do not write because I need to, but rather because it is how I process the land of my make-believe inner world, and its fictitious residents, and reconcile it to the broader world where the real people reside. If I did not make images and write songs, I would be reduced to gibbering. WHEN YOU STEP INTO THE WORLD OF CYBERSPACE DO YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE ABLE TO CONNECT WITH OTHERS? (EXPLAIN) Sometimes. Sometimes not. I...

read more

Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Posted on Jul 9, 2014 in Blog, Lila Moore

Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Part 2: Her Sight and Insight By Lila Moore (Part 1 can be found here.) The heroine’s journey is an evolving myth.  It is not simply a product of ancient times like the hero’s journey, though, there are some archaic texts with leading protagonists who are often goddesses or associated with them. There are also the classics, The Little Mermaid, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, and the Wizard’s of Oz that, with rich tapestry of symbols and archetypes, imaginative visuals and soulful depth, present the journey of an extraordinary heroine. This type of heroine, unlike those depicted with nothing to do in recent films, has much to do, discover, overcome and manifest. She is a different type of leader and fighter for justice and nothing like the mythic hero. The hero searches for the meaning of the Soul and a union with Her, often disguised in the form of a princess whom he marries after the successful completion of his ordeal and quest. The mythic heroine as an archetype is the Soul’s manifestation on Earth and in the Cosmos, and here to show us how to transform and evolve. Clearly, each individual heroine’s journey reflects some aspects of the Soul, a story which is part of a much larger story of evolution in consciousness and worldview. There is no way a single heroine could carry the vision and burden of the entire task. Therefore, as a global culture we need many more stories and myths about her journey, new films and interactive platforms and games. The heroine’s journey as a mythic tale is not yet fully known. We will get to know it as we make it, watch and interact with it. It is a vision about the future. It is perhaps no coincidence that the first photorealist, computer-animated science-fiction film portrays the heroine’s journey through the sight and insight of the leading protagonist. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (Dir: Hironobu Sakaguchi, Moto Sakakibara, 2001) is led by the character Doctor Aki Ross, a scientist who has discovered how to save the Earth from an infectious, deadly virus-like race of aliens called Phantoms. From the very start of the film, the post apocalyptic landscape of Earth and the ruins of New York City are seen from the point of view of Aki, with the first close-up shot of her eye signifying that this is her gaze. Hence, the viewers are subliminally informed that the story will unfold as Aki sees it. She is in a position of power to lead the course of the story and determine humanity’s destiny. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within, the trailer It is also revealed that Aki’s sight is not limited to events in the physical world of action. Aki’s recurring nightmares are fundamental to her mission to save the Earth. Through her dreams, she learns that the aliens are the restless spirits of dead aliens which crashed on Earth with fragments of their destroyed planet. They are not ‘the enemy’ as the world’s leadership council and General Hein view them, but displaced and terrorized spirits in need of healing and liberation. Aki has to navigate her way towards a peaceful resolution to the world’s crisis against towering opposition. Heim is determined to convince the council that the best way forward is to attack and...

read more

Whose Gaze is it?  Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Posted on Jul 9, 2014 in Blog, Lila Moore

Whose Gaze is it?  Exploring the Heroine’s Journey in Film through her Sight and Insight

Part I: Introduction to the Gaze By Lila Moore There is a subtle exchange, an invisible interplay, between images and viewers in the cinema which induces emotions and meanings. As the Kuleshov Effect shows, meanings are generated by the viewers as a result of a cognitive processing of the film’s assembly of visual data. Alfred Hitchcock demonstrated the Kuleshov Effect in a 1964 CBC documentary as a manipulative editing technique that invites the viewers to make meaningful sense of the way the images on screen interrelate and unfold. Alfred Hitchcock explains the Kuleshov Effect to host-director Fletcher Markle, CBC, 1964. Hitchcock’s choice of images and their subsequent meanings also highlight socially established conventions and sexual difference that have controlled the structure and form of film, media and popular culture for decades. The female character in Hitchcock’s montage is dominated by the male gaze as an object of affection (mother) or a (dirty) sex object (the girl in bikini as seen by a dirty old man). She has no active role, or individual consciousness and meaning-making facility, beyond her service to the male gaze. The latter consists of the gaze of the hero, the male viewer, and the point of view of the camera that ensures the patriarchal order. The female viewer, like the female character, is subordinated to the same gaze. What he sees and feels must be right. She is what he makes of her. As Laura Mulvey implied, the woman is the image and not the maker of meanings. The male gaze is a term coined by Mulvey in her seminal essay Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema, (1975). Laura Malvey Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema Examples Regardless of progress made in theory and film practice since the emergence of feminist film theory in the 1970s, it is still relevant to question the often covert patriarchal worldview represented by the male gaze in popular visual culture.  It is also essential to ponder on the reasons for the lack in heroines that can bravely determine the destiny of their journeys and embody our global and collective myths. Tasha Robinson’s article We are Losing all our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome discusses the gradual, and often covert, disempowerment of female characters in mainstream cinema. Robinson emphasizes the phenomenon of interesting female characters in films that end up with nothing to do.  The presence of these characters does not hint on the filmmakers’ intention to integrate intelligent and capable female characters. Many films are loosely based on the structure of the Hero’s Journey and are not occupied with the role of possibly relevant, though not central to the action, female characters. However, The Trinity Syndrome, as explained by Robinson, highlights wise, compassionate and resourceful female characters being portrayed while they are wasted away, unable to lead and transform the course of any plot or mythic tale. They are trapped in a narrative construct which, embedded in patriarchal sensibility, refuses or is merely unable to unleash and manifest their full potential. One such heroine is Robin Wright, playing herself in The Congress (Dir: Ari Folman, 2013), which reflects on her career in mainstream cinema and the limits put on her development as an actress and film character. See: the film synopsis. The Congress Trailer Robin, as a mature protagonist, is unable...

read more

Study With Master Philosopher Pierre Grimes

Posted on Jun 17, 2014 in Blog, Nijole Sparkis

Study With Master Philosopher Pierre Grimes

It is an honor for c3 to support the work of the legendary philosopher Pierre Grimes. 1) Alan Watts has called you a “true Jnana Yogi.” Could you explain to us what that tradition is, and its significance to the modern spiritual seeker? The furthermost reach of the mind brings Man to discover the meaning of existence and the source of that existence. There are different spiritual practices and forms of yoga designed to achieve that goal and Jnana Yoga is the way of wisdom. The classical philosophers of the Hellenics, from Xenophanes through Plato, Plotinus to Damascius, called this Jnana Yoga the elements of theology. Their counterpart in Tibetan Buddhism is the yoga or method of realizing Nirvana through knowing the mind, which can be found in the four-volume work on Tibetan Buddhism edited by Evan-Wentz, and other Tibetan Buddhist works. Our Jnana Yoga looks into the wisdom traditions’ most profound teachings for insights into the way the mind can come to know the mind, along with identifying and removing the blocks to achieving that noblest of goals, knowing thy Self and discovering its source. Contemporary seekers are not aware of the richness of this way of wisdom and so resort to a variety of spiritual disciplines and secondary devices to achieve enlightenment. 2) How did you come to found the Opening Mind Academy? Opening Mind Academy began after Chong-An S’nim of the Korean Chogye Ch’an Sect observed my practice of philosophical midwifery over a period of time, and challenged me to give talks at his temple on his translation of the Diamond Sutra in order to demonstrate to myself that I was a true teacher. From this exchange, I and Chong-An S’nim created the Opening Mind Academy as a higher unity implicit in each of our spiritual traditions. Each of the profound traditions of Ch’an Buddhism and Platonism is aware of the significance of both understanding and experiencing the inner mind to perceive the nature of what has been called enlightenment. Thus, the goal of the OMA is to integrate the rational understanding with the contemplative tradition and to open the mind to the truth which from the beginning has been innately available to us. 3) You are an expert in classical Hellenic spiritual philosophical tradition. Do you agree with other scholars that much of the philosophy of Jesus in the New Testament is based in Hellenic and Platonic philosophy? The task Plato sets for the reader of his Republic is to become the philosopher-king, not of a political realm, but of the realm of one’s own soul. Its achievement depends upon gaining experience and knowledge of the “most Brilliant Light of Being”, which is also called Beauty itself, the Idea of the Good, and Reality or Truth. However, such enlightenment does not bring with it a heightened sense of ethics, so Platonists urge the cultivation of a higher sense of human excellence that must be borne from that experience, otherwise folly is likely to continue. From this stage of enlightenment it is possible to be open to the Good itself, or the One. The repeated themes throughout Plato and other Hellenic philosophers are: to Know Thyself, to encounter divine luminosity, to reach for the Good, or the One itself, while developing a natural integrity for all...

read more

Venture Artist, Winter Lazerus, interviews photographer Winston Swift Boyer

Posted on May 6, 2014 in Artist's Spotlight

Venture Artist, Winter Lazerus, interviews photographer Winston Swift Boyer

  On May 17th, at Sacred Cinema: You are cordially invited to a One Evening Artist Salon / Gallery featuring photographs from renowned photographer Winston Swift Boyer‘s “Ocean Series”. Salon opens at 7pm. Sacred Cinema / Besant Lodge 2560 North Beachwood Drive Los Angeles, CA Parking in the neighborhood as always What first drew you to photography? I started my life in Moab, Utah in the 1950s. At that time Moab was a Uranium town. My mother had gone to art school and wanted to be an artist. Bringing up children changed that and she became an elementary school teacher. Between teaching and taking care of us children she would work on her art, wood blocks, sculpting, writing and illustrating children’s stories. My father was a prospector and also had a wonderful sense of the arts. He would always be going to flea markets and come home with things like faded reproductions of impressionist paintings, small folk art sculptures mixed with corroded prospectors’ claw picks, beat up gold panning pans, broken geiger counters, coyote skulls and what not. Needless to say I was surrounded by wonderfully eclectic artifacts, great art, and a fantastic landscape. At an early age, six or so, I started taking pictures with a Brownie camera and became fascinated with taking photographs. That impulse has never left me. What are you looking for in a photograph? I am capturing something that captures me. What other artists inform or influence your work? I do not differentiate photography from other art mediums which gives me the freedom to become immersed in all forms of art. My influences range from the abstract impressionists to primitive art, from Edward Weston to Helmut Newton, from unknown past work to unknown future work. My list is probably infinite. What types of photographic techniques are you exploring the most? My philosophy of photographic technique is that it should be used as a tool and not an end. My interest started as a color photographer. I shot with Kodachrome film and developed my own Cibachrome prints (a printing process for positive film). Kodachrome was never meant to printed it was meant to be projected. When Cibachrome came out it was able to capture the drastic contrast range of Kodachrome. To print Kodachrome I needed an image that had even lighting, so I started seeing in Kodachrome and Cibachrome and shot accordingly. For instance here are two color photographers who come to mind who have a very different end product, Joel Meyerowitz and Richard Misrach. They both shoot color negative film. A much less contrasty process. They were probably seeing in color negative film and C Prints (a printing process for color negative) which are inherently softer in look. When the digital world opened up I dropped all film and went to the digital process. Not because I did not like Kodachrome but I got captured by a newer process that had much more range. With each technique I seek out the best of its qualities to match the vision that I see. What is the best advice you have for a young person who wants to be a photographer professionally? I am not per se a professional photographer, meaning one that shoots commercial work. Commercial work is wonderful and very disciplined work. When I...

read more

Transformative Views: Lights, Camera and Transformation

Posted on Apr 26, 2014 in Blog, Lila Moore

Transformative Views: Lights, Camera and Transformation

Transformation and again transformation, the eternal entertainment of the eternal spirit. J. W. Goethe   Transformation is described by C.G. Jung as the “the basic instinct of civilization.” The desire to transform is embedded in our body and psyche. Transformation is an unstoppable impulse, and the aspiration to reveal the often invisible trends that drive it forward is as inescapable. We are destined to transform as creatures of nature and evolution. As transforming conscious beings, we express and explore our transformations not only in biological terms. Transformation happens through the unique products; technological and scientific inventions and metaphysical and conceptual revelations, of our culture. Transformation, as a deeply felt visceral and spiritual experience is an integral part of our interaction with pivotal works of art in any aesthetic medium. It is also the underlying function of religious and spiritual, myths, rites and practices throughout the ages. This column is dedicated to transformation as a motif, archetype, and aesthetic, scientific and technological factor and method. It seeks to explore transformative imagery, text and performative actions as they transpire in 2D & 3D film/video, time-based art, and as part of online, interactive, virtual and immersive environments and technologies. Here, we shall ask, can the moving image and time-based, interactive and immersive aesthetics reclaim and/or evolve art’s ritualistic, transformative and healing heritage and function, and how. In addition, what are the current transformative potentials of Artivism? This is a valid query as the strategies and aesthetics of art and activism are often expressed and operate differently. Here we engage in the exploration of the needs for transformative content, and the innovative and aesthetic ways through which transformative elements are implemented in contemporary works and settings. Moreover, this column celebrates transformation as a cyclic movement forward and as aesthetic and technological evolution which honors its terrestrial Gaian origins. Since the late 1960s, modern technology has brought the Earth and the Universe to people’s awareness through perpetual streams of striking images. Views of Earth from space and the sight of almost any geographical location in the world have become freely available. Likewise, the overall impact of human activity on the natural environment is visible to virtually everyone. It is clear that humanity has been transforming the natural environment for its own benefits, depleting natural resources and driving other life forms to a point of extinction. Utilizing the language of metaphors, the body of the Earth mirrors the human body as an integral organic part of it. Hence, the image of humanity destroying the natural world is also the image of human self-annihilation. There may be other glorious futures possible, life in other planets for the post-humans or trans-humans. But should we as creatures of this beautiful and diverse planet throw out the baby, i.e., our human heritage, with the bath water as we transform? Where do we trace our humanity? Where do we find the origins of the Soul? I believe that we instantly recognize the ‘human touch’, its darkest despair and brightest greatness, the divine spark within, in works of art. We recognize and see the Soul reflected in the poetry of the muses as they dance throughout the creative evolution of the arts. In Caves of Forgotten Dream (2010), Werner Herzog takes the film viewers down Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc cave in southern France where,...

read more

The Gap – (Global Artistic Pulse)

Posted on Apr 4, 2014 in Blog, Coni Koepfinger

The Gap  – (Global Artistic Pulse)

Between art and technology – 2014 cjkoepfinger Ghandi once said that you can tell the health of a nation by the way it treats its animals, I would like to borrow that metaphor yet rephrase it to fit here in our discussions. You can tell the spiritual health of world by the way it treats and appreciates its artists – but then again the animal and the artist have much in common. Driven by instinctual passion, both will dig to find a bone and often have to bark continuously till they get the attention of there masters. The second half of the 20th century was a sad state of affairs for many the struggling artists. What started out as a boom in the swinging sixties shortly fizzled out in the seventies and eighties and corporate greed and commodity education soon tuned the anthem of the times. Liberal arts degrees soon became communication careers and man’s search for truth, beauty and meaning hopelessly lost somewhere in the collective consciousness. Thankfully the century soon enough came to an end and the creative pulse began picking up thanks to technology. With new ways to discovery, it seemed as if the ransom of the age was being paid and the hostages who sought the arts set free again. With computers to work faster, leisure time was reconsidered. The cyber world soon created a doorway for new dimensions in imagination. And with this emerged a new artist – a new hybrid storyteller, who can respond to his or her muse at the touch of a button. Welcome to cyberspace – Alice has finally found wonder land – a place to wonder and wander beyond the ordinary lines of space and time. Here we can boldly go to create an alternative life that suits our fancy – here we can connect with others ad infinitum and beyond – here you can literally explore limitless possibilities – now knowing that we are – alas, infinite yet bound only by the guidelines of our own imagineering. It almost feels like we are able to fly. Maybe this is exactly what flying feels like – at least now we can flock together with other like minds. Today we can consciously create new images and ideas and fractal patterns that garner our very fabric of existence, in a very new and exciting way. In this column The GAP, we will explore the pulse of artists today all over the world. We will see what makes things tick in the midst of technology and try to understand why there is a definite difference in the world. Is drama changing? Is there now the need for meta theatre? And what about music? If we are seriously considering the colonization of Mars then I am sure the music of the spheres could well be shifting us to a higher consciousness. Certainly movies are changing, it was recently predicted that the flat screen will soon be extinct. Here in The GAP we will compare notes from country to country by looking at art in the making to see what is becoming the cutting edge -and why. And finally we take time to coddle the artist with tastes and tidbits of new work new followed by only the most gracious commentary – for the task...

read more

Waterwheel World

Posted on Mar 21, 2014 in Blog, Lila Moore

Waterwheel World

Water Day Symposium – 3WDS14 FROM 17-23 MARCH 2014, more than 200 people from 5 continents will present their latest work about water. Children, youth, communities, TED talkers, scientists, activists and artists will interact with audience online and in 18 nodes (physical venues) in Argentina, Australia, Colombia, France, Germany, Greece, Israel, Morocco, New Zealand, Poland, USA, Taiwan & Tunisia. The entire symposium will be streamed online via Waterwheel platform for audiences to watch and interact from their own computers anywhere in the world, free of charge! WATER VIEWS: CARING AND DARING is this year’s symposium theme. The program is composed of 42 sessions, caters to all time zones, and focuses on art, science and activism. It explores questions about how we are living, and will continue to live, with water and its contrasts. Demands for new perceptions and approaches to water management, urban planning, and cooperation, as well as renewed respect for water as a vital resource and shared heritage are highlighted through transdisciplinary approaches. Waterwheel was created two and a half years ago, by an Australian team – Inkahoots, Igneous and Suzon Fuks who initiated the platform on the basis of her main interests: water issues and “networked performance” or performance on the internet that uses mass communication tools. Fuks is a Brisbane-based experimental artist, choreographer and director, committed to making and developing art that examines, reflects upon, and helps us survive today’s disjointed worlds. Originally from Belgian where water is in abundance, she became aware of the issues and politics around water in the early 90’s after living for three years in a place in India where access to water regulated life. When she moved to Brisbane, Australia she witnessed the impact of severe drought for several years and then big floods in the city. These events led her to conceive Waterwheel which she initially researched and developed with a fellowship from Australia Council for the Arts. It has been formulated as an ongoing project open to all, for cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural water-related dialogues and exchanges around the globe. The Waterwheel platform is built on water vocabulary evoking the parallel between the theme of water and the Internet. The metaphoric interrelation between the planetary currents of water and the electronic transference of data and communication is one of the key aspects which attracted me to the platform, first as a user and audience and eventually as crew. When people enter the site they encounter words and visual signs like fountain, tap, crew and dock, which give them an idea how to use the platform. Visitors are encouraged to upload and share media which is soon after reflected in the ripples of the central fountain where it can be accessed and viewed. Overall, Waterwheel offers a participatory and holistic experience of water based on the awareness that wherever one maybe in the world, he/she is part of the same environmental tides, sharing the water of one Earth. This year’s symposium will open with a performance by Ulay, renowned artist from Slovenia – who previously worked with Marina Abramovic – followed by a performance by internationally acclaimed Singaporean artist, Jason Lim. Children and youth will have their say amongst adults in sessions such as Activism, Art and Science, Sea Level Rise, and Art and Ecology. Curator Keti Haliori from...

read more

Intimate Interview with Steve Roach

Posted on Oct 30, 2013 in Artist's Spotlight

Intimate Interview with Steve Roach

Vortex Immersion Media and the c3: Center for Conscious Creativity are honored to be presenting a three concert series: Ultra Immersion:  Deep, Deeper, Deepest…. in The Vortex Dome by famed electronic musical artist, Steve Roach accompanied by stunning 360 visuals created by visual artist, Audri Phillips. Listen to a podcast of the event here: http://www.synthtopia.com/content/2013/10/31/steve-roach-in-the-vortex-dome/ Kate McCallum, c3 Founder and Executive Director, had the chance to interview Steve about his perspectives on music and the fulldome experience: 1.  How did you get started in music? My path to creating  music primarily  came from an awareness or awakening to the essence of sound thru immersing in long periods of solitary time in deserts, mountains and coastal areas growing up in San Diego. From an early age there was a draw and power in these places that seemed to eclipse the normal trajectory of what I was born into, growing up in the  SoCal baby boomer factory. This feeling I was tapping into something vast and eternal was accessed in a deeper kind of silence and sense of space you can find in the desert for example. This kind of boost into this inner place was filled with sound, before music. This is really the core of my work,  sound emerges first,  and what is called  music in my work grows out of this quality of tone that is inside the sounds I create, the music emerges from this point. 2.  What led you to electronic music? As this awareness of the power of  sound began to evolve within me and become more visceral and all encompassing, the path to using the early synthesizers  was a perfectly timed discovery. These instruments for me were like finding  surgical instruments  for investigating perception and awareness. With these tools and a directed intention you can instantly change the magnification and go way down inside of a sound, revealing emotions and and mental states  not usually accessed in ordinary music, art and the day to day encounters of life or even with the right mind altering agents. Eventually I added other instruments that hold this relationship of  sound as a transformative tool. For example after 2 extended trips through Australia I discovered the didgeridoo in the mid 80s’ before it had made its way into popular culture. This instrument gave me the same feeling I received from deep churning analog synthesizer drones, combining the two  created this bridge  through time and place.  Both are activating the same part of our consciousness. Eventually I added cello to this mix and that was yet another wonderful opening,  even deeper. That kind of creative spiral is what I love to explore. Right now in my work after 30 years the lines are gone of what is electronic or acoustic, ancient or modern. There are no rules or boundaries. I continue to be drawn to the instruments that give me the most direct response and feel in my fingertips, body, and soul. Above all  there is a quality of sound I must hear as this is the medicine inside the music. This is what calls to me every day to create and hear what is just beyond my reach, it’s an essential form of nourishment and breath. My approach has always been to use hardware instruments in the studio and live....

read more

From ‘Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights’: Politics and Light Interplay in the Art of Miles Regis

Posted on Aug 3, 2012 in Blog

Miles participated in our STATE OF THE ARTS 2011 PRODUCING CHANGE event with 3D visual artist Brian Quandt and showcased “The Music Peace” as a 360 fulldome experience in The Vortex Dome.  Congratulations Miles! From ‘Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights’: Politics and Light Interplay in the Art of Miles Regis From The Huffington Post   It’s easy to compare noteworthy contemporary artists to those who’ve gone before.  In the case of Miles Regis, a Trinidadian-born multi-media artist based in Los Angeles, that associative list is undeniably impressive: Basquiat, Gaugin, Pollock, Dali and Rivera, to name a few. But Regis did not learn his craft studying the masters of Art History. Regis began organically, in the influences of his childhood in the Caribbean — of Carnival and calypso — and from watching Caribbean artists like his uncle, Alexander King. Regis’s most current show at the Barnsdall Art Park “Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights” is at once culturally transcendent and energized by a rooted sense of personal and historical experience. Two pieces, “Zoo Capitalism” and “Follow Your Truth,” recall the aesthetic and political pageantry of Trinidad’s Carnival. “Subconsciously I feel like I’m almost doing costuming on canvas,” he says. “During Carnival there were always political statements being made with vibrant textures and colors.” Regis’s own canvasses are alive with thick black lines, figurative and free-form, and striking flashes of crimson, yellow and baby blue. His uncle Alexander King’s piece “Pan God,” taking its title from the abbreviated name of the steel drum invented by Trinidadians, has had profound influence on the artist. “Nobody’s work has moved me the way my uncle’s work has,” he explains. Another artist Regis admires is Leroy Clarke who painted a lot about Trinidadian folklore and mythology. “He was raw and true in his work.” Regis discusses the idea of “ancestral energies” guiding him through his own work. Kin and culture flow freely through pieces like “Kiss the Kids For Me,” “Yet So Happy” and “Occupy Truth” as do candid expressions of inner-child. It’s no surprise that the title of this exhibition “Civil Wrongs to Civil Rights” originated with his nine-year-old son Djimon, who was doing a book report on Martin Luther King, Jr. At the Barnsdall Gallery Theater exhibition Regis debuts two exciting new installations. The first is part found-object, part 3D art simulation. Regis constructs a four-foot box made with various pieces of scrap wood that he picked up randomly around LA, and painted over with what have become his signature one-eyed hieroglyphic figures. Installed within the box is a 3-D presentation visible only through carefully carved out peep-holes. Downstairs, Regis invites viewers into a large screening room for a 3-D filmed demonstration of his creative process. On-screen Regis’s swift hand movements and handsome demeanor are matched by his powerful, soothing voice showcased in his original musical compositions and a breathtaking cover of the classic “Both Sides Now.” The video installation culminates in a three-dimensional presentation of one of Regis’s most important works in this series. In “The Music Peace” Regis’s textured, vibrant colors are not merely expressions of bold emotion and positivity, but together a courageous invitation for all to seek personal truth and unity of spirit. “Sometimes truth can be finding peace within your struggles.” His work is the perfect expression of who...

read more

YouTube to Double Down on Its ‘Channel’ Experiment

Posted on Aug 2, 2012 in Blog

July 30, 2012 Wall Street Journal For Google Inc.’s YouTube it was a $150 million experiment: Seed dozens of new video “channels” on its Web service and see what works. So far, Google likes what it sees from the eight-month effort. The company says it will put in another $200 million to market the channels as it attempts to upgrade its content from simple user-generated videos and to lure more viewers and advertising. The site has launched nearly 100 new channels so far this year, attracting talent such as actor Amy Poehler to create or star in original episodes in an effort to draw new audiences—and blue-chip advertisers. YouTube has secured commitments from advertisers to run more than $150 million of ads on the channels this year, according to a person with direct knowledge of the sales. YouTube officials declined to comment on the figures. YoutubeWayne Brady and Chester See in a video on the YOMYOMF channel. The channels themselves, meanwhile, are working to find their place, with a lot of trial and error along the way. “Just because you build it doesn’t mean they’ll come,” says former television executive Larry Aidem, talking about YouTube viewers. In February, Mr. Aidem launched a YouTube channel about emerging music artists. The channel, called MyISH, got off to a slow start, featuring many videos in which presenters simply talked about their favorite artists. “It was crickets,” said Mr. Aidem, previously chief executive of the Sundance cable-TV channel. After studying viewer feedback, MyISH realized “the audience wasn’t big on talking heads” and wasn’t interested in a wide variety of musical genres. So Mr. Aidem and his team retooled the channel, hiring well-known YouTube personality Michael Buckley to anchor funny videos about pop stars like Katy Perry that also featured music clips. They also narrowed the channel’s focus to pop music. Within weeks, MyISH shot up the rankings. It became the 120th-most-viewed YouTube channel in June with more than 700,000 unique visitors, up from a No. 803 ranking and 130,000 unique visitors in April, according to comScore Inc. Mr. Aidem’s experience, which mirrors that of several other first-time YouTube producers, shows how finding the right formula to make a new channel stand out on the world’s leading video site remains a work in progress. Robert Kyncl, a YouTube vice president and architect of the channels initiative, said his team and the channel creators are “feeling our way through” the process to find a “great blueprint” for the content will work best on the site. He added that he’s pleased with the “very healthy growth” of the new channels so far. Among the new channels, 10 of them average more than one million video views per week, he said. YouTube plans to expand its channels initiative to Europe by funding a couple dozen video channels for British and French viewers by next year, according to people familiar with its initiative. Mr. Kyncl declined to comment. In contrast with TV, YouTube’s fast production process and the lower costs of online video means producers can make near-instant changes to their programs in response to viewer feedback. As a result, YouTube channel producers say the rapid evolution of their content will eventually allow them to find the best way to attract large audiences for the long term. YouTube...

read more

Six Keys to Implementing a Video Marketing Strategy

Posted on Aug 1, 2012 in Blog

Six Keys to Implementing a Video Marketing Strategy THE VIDEO OPPORTUNITY The use of video in business is exploding. For entertainment, commerce, education, and collaboration, video is empowering new experiences and business models. For consumers, there is a world of new choice in what they watch, when they watch it and how – every second, an hour of video is uploaded to YouTube, and quality programming is flocking to various other destinations on new TV, mobile and web destinations. For businesses, there is opportunity as well to better connect with audiences, employees and other stakeholders in ways never before feasible. Enterprises are rushing to maximize these opportunities: according to the Aberdeen Group, 74% of enterprises either have or are plan- ning video distribution strategies, and 60% have or are planning to use video for internal collaboration. EXECUTION: STRATEGY’S BEST FRIEND As marketers have rushed to develop solid business strategies around video, they face several challenges. The video landscape continues to change, and the number of video initiatives in any one organization has skyrocketed. This has created a maze of complexity around asset management, video formatting and storage, access controls and workflow approval processes. To capture the wealth of opportunity video presents, marketers must first master the realities of executing those strategies. SIX KEYS TO IMPLEMENTING A VIDEO MARKETING STRATEGY Early adopters, industry analysts and pundits cite various requirements for success with video. We’ve assembled six core concepts. Adhering to these principles enable each stakeholder in the video marketing lifecyle to do her part with minimal exposure to technological, strategic or organizational pitfalls. 1. CLOUD-BASED STORAGE As video initiatives grow more numerous, crossing both functional as well as geographic borders, video teams by definition become distributed teams. This creates a major technological hurdle for project managers and producers, who need the ability to transport files among individuals at any time during a given project. Video teams need access to a cloud-based storage solution built to han- dle video and all of its various file formats and components – a solution to store master files for download and later use, while also serving as a virtual backup and online system of record for project assets. 2. USABILITY As marketers, customer service teams, and other less-technical members of the business community begin to produce and leverage video, standards for usabil- ity become extremely important. Teams with different technology proficiencies need to be able to use the same platform. This puts an onus on the platform to be both powerful enough to handle the required technical video management functions, but also designed for ease-of-use. 3. COLLABORATION Producing video is an inherently collaborative function, requiring multiple stake- holders throughout the lifecycle. Yet, most video software is designed for a single user. To provide a sustainable solution, video marketers need a collaborative platform that enables multiple users to access and interact with each other, with specified roles, permissions and privileges. In other words, the video marketing platform must reflect the social structure and functional design of the team itself. 4. A WORLD-CLASS PLAYER As audiences get bombarded with more and more content opportunities, stellar video playback experiences will win out over average ones. For this reason, video player technology is paramount. What were once “premium” features – fast loading times, the ability to deliver high-quality formats,...

read more

SIGHT: A Futuristic Perspective of Augmented Reality….

Posted on Jul 30, 2012 in Blog

AUGMENTED REALITY is a new communication technology rising in the media landscape.  Here is an intriguing fictional take by filmmakers Eran May-ray and Daneile Lazo on where AR could go. How would you use this powerful technology? Sight – A Futuristic Film about Augmented Reality A short futuristic film by Eran May-raz and Daniel Lazo. This is their graduation project from Bezaleal Academy of Arts posted on Vimeo.

read more

The Fifth Sacred Thing

Posted on Jul 30, 2012 in Blog

“The Fifth Sacred Thing,” by author and visionary Starhawk, is an excellent example of using the power of story to portray and inspire hope and a better future for humanity.   Starhawk and her team are now working to create a motion picture from the novel.   The Fifth Sacred Thing cover art by Keith Batcheller They say that movies are collective dreams.  If so, we’re heading for a nightmare—for there are very few films that show a positive future on earth.  We want to change that.  How can we create a thriving, just and balanced future if we can’t even imagine it?  We want to bring alive a vision that can inspire people—and we’ve found the story in Starhawk’s novel, The Fifth Sacred Thing. In the story, set in 2048, Northern California has survived eco-catastrophes, wars and epidemics and forged a society based on respect for the Four Sacred Things that support life: air, fire, water and earth.  Streets are turned into gardens, streams flow free, people of all races and religions live in harmony – until the militarist Southlands attack.  How can the people of a peaceful society fight against ruthless invaders without becoming what they’re fighting against?  Musician-turned-guerilla Bird, his story-teller grandmother Maya, and Madrone, the healer, must wield a force more powerful than weapons—the fifth sacred thing In the eighteen years since its publication, hundreds of thousands of people have read The Fifth Sacred Thing and been moved by its imagery and drama. Now, at this time when our future seems so precarious, we want to bring it to the screen and to a whole new generation who are more visual than verbal. Making a movie of a book that so many people love is a scary venture. We feel a huge responsibility — first to be faithful to the book’s artistic vision, to make a film that moves people emotionally, that’s dramatic and funny and edge-of-the-seat powerful. But also, we want to be faithful to the values of earth-care and social justice the book represents. Not just in what the movie portrays, but also in the way we go about making it. We’ve written a Green Plan that will set new standards for environmental accountability in the film industry. We’ll bring resources into the inner city by networking with community organizations with whom we have longstanding relationships. We’ll expand our website with extensive resources and develop many ways that people who are inspired by the vision can learn the skills they need to create it and connect with others who share it. We want the movie to help nurture and support the movements that are already growing to put our world on a path of peace, justice and ecological harmony. This video gives an overview of our project and the immensely inspiring collaborations that are emerging to support its development. We are only at the beginning stages now of realizing our vision; yet the community support already demonstrated has been overwhelmingly abundant and positive. If you are inspired to support our cause, please consider a donation to our Kickstarter fundraising campaign. Read more about it at the website:  www.fifthsacredthing.com...

read more

The Art of Innovation

Posted on Jul 25, 2012 in Blog

Walter E. Massey, Ph.D. President of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, President Emeritus of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga. The Art of Innovation Posted: 07/19/2012 3:41 pm Recently I delivered the closing keynote address at the Committee on Institutional Cooperation’s Global University Summit to a group of higher education leaders from around the world on the topic of innovation — or more specifically, “developing talent to drive innovation in a global society.” The audience consisted of presidents, chancellors, and provosts of major research universities from around the world. As president of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), I was the lone representative from an art and design school, so I took the opportunity to share what institutions like mine can contribute to global innovation. As a longtime cultural enthusiast, yet somewhat new president of a school of art and design, I have a newfound appreciation for the importance of the kind of education offered by these schools. Subsequently, my views on what drives innovation in society have broadened as a result of being in this new world. As a physicist and erstwhile “science guy,” I have honed my views on innovation through the lens of science and technology — and the established and almost canonical scientific paradigm. An oversimplification of that paradigm goes like this: basic research uncovers new insights and understandings leading to engineering and new products, devices, and methodologies, which then spawns new innovative enterprises. This paradigm was promoted by Vannevar Bush, which led to the founding of the National Science Foundation in the U.S. His seminal report, “The Endless Frontier,” made the case for government support of fundamental research because that underlying research would lead to new intellectual frontiers, which would lead to economic development. This paradigm has worked and in many ways is still valid. However, a closer examination of the innovative process reveals it is not that simple or straightforward. We certainly need more scientists, engineers, and mathematicians, but we may have been missing an opportunity by not more effectively engaging in the innovative process one of the most creative groups in our society — artists and designers. At SAIC, our curriculum is based on an interdisciplinary approach to art, design, and innovation. Sculpture students take writing classes; writing students study designed objects; design students enroll in art history classes; and art history students use the wood and metal shops. Our students have the freedom to design their own pathways. They move freely among disciplines to integrate content and technique. They cut across boundaries. They create hybrid practices, and they explore all aspects of their creativity in order to address complex issues. Students at many other art and design schools have similar experiences. This kind of education is exactly what is needed to develop the talented individuals who will drive innovation in society — the kind of people that columnist David Brooks described in a recent New York Times editorial entitled “The Creative Monopoly.” In that article Brooks discusses how we live in a culture that nurtures competitive skills, such as rigor, reliability, and discipline. All necessary, but these skills need to be supplemented with traits such as alertness, independence, and the ability to reclaim forgotten traditions. He argues, “Creative people don’t follow the crowds. They seek out the blank spots...

read more